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Newsroom image for the post Pay Equity Advocates Leverage Shareholder Derivative Lawsuits To Drive Pay Equity Efforts

Posted April 5, 2021 with Tags , ,

Pay Equity Advocates Leverage Shareholder Derivative Lawsuits To Drive Pay Equity Efforts

Pay equity advocates have used a variety of mechanisms to pressure employers to prioritize pay equity in the workplace. These efforts include shareholder resolutions regarding pay equity, threats of divestiture, and public campaigns against particular employers. Recently, pay equity advocates have unveiled a new tactic to enhance pressure on public corporations to prioritize pay equity: failure to comply with their own pay equity promises. These lawsuits signal a new front in the activist war against perceived pay inequities.

Posted March 26, 2021 with Tags ,

California’s New Supplemental Paid Sick Leave for COVID-19

California recently passed new legislation that will require employers to provide their California employees with up to 80 hours of supplemental paid sick leave for various COVID-19-related reasons. Sound familiar? There are some similarities between the new law and the 2020 COVID-19 supplemental paid sick law, but the differences are significant for many employers. We’ve put together key takeaways for you to consider before the law becomes effective on Monday, March 29, 2021.

Newsroom image for the post Business Travelers and Nonimmigrant Workers Face New Challenges

Posted March 3, 2021 with Tags ,

Business Travelers and Nonimmigrant Workers Face New Challenges

On March 2, 2021, the U.S. Department of State announced unexpectedly that, effective immediately, it has rescinded a previous policy on categories of business travelers and nonimmigrant workers eligible for National Interest Exceptions (NIEs) to Presidential Proclamation 10143, which restricts travel from the European Schengen Area, the United Kingdom, and Ireland.  The new policy will indeed make it more difficult for business travelers and nonimmigrant workers to obtain permission to travel to the United States.

Newsroom image for the post FAQs for Employers: Minneapolis’ Right to Recall Ordinance

Posted February 26, 2021 with Tags ,

FAQs for Employers: Minneapolis’ Right to Recall Ordinance

Minneapolis employers in the hospitality industry will likely soon have to contend with a new set of worker protection laws. The Minneapolis City Council is currently considering a citywide Hospitality Worker Right to Recall Ordinance, which would require employers to rehire workers previously terminated due to the Coronavirus pandemic. If adopted, the Ordinance will go into effect on May 1, 2021. Meanwhile, the Minnesota Legislature is considering a similar right to recall law, which would apply statewide to a larger group of employers.

Newsroom image for the post Not Biden His Time: Biden Administration Announces Intentions to Make Immigration Reform a Top Administrative Priority

Posted January 26, 2021 with Tags , ,

Not Biden His Time: Biden Administration Announces Intentions to Make Immigration Reform a Top Administrative Priority

Immediately after President Joe Biden took office, his administration unveiled a series of Executive Actions and legislative proposals designed to signal its top priorities. The actions taken within his first week include reversing Executive Orders issued by the Trump Administration, withdrawing certain pending regulations, delaying the implementation of regulations made by the Trump Administration post-election, and pushing forward a legislative overhaul of the current immigration system. These actions and proposals signal that modernizing the current immigration system will be one of the top priorities of the new administration.

Newsroom image for the post Courtney Ward-Reichard, Editor of “Mass Torts in the United States”

Posted January 25, 2021 with Tags

Courtney Ward-Reichard, Editor of “Mass Torts in the United States”

"Mass torts" is an incredibly broad term that includes many disparate substantive areas--everything from an airplane accident that injures many individuals at once, to asbestos claims involving alleged exposure and injury over the course of many decades. This book aims to provide a useful guide that examines most phases of mass tort cases while appealing to attorneys of varying levels of experience in many different types of cases.

Newsroom image for the post Employer Incentivization of COVID-19 Vaccination

Posted January 19, 2021 with Tags ,

Employer Incentivization of COVID-19 Vaccination

Many employers are seeking ways to encourage their employees to get vaccinated for COVID-19. For those wishing to stop short of making it mandatory, incentivizing voluntary vaccination is an option, but one that comes with its own set of potential legal pitfalls employers should be aware of.

Newsroom image for the post Brandie Morgenroth Promoted to Shareholder at Nilan Johnson Lewis

Posted January 5, 2021

Brandie Morgenroth Promoted to Shareholder at Nilan Johnson Lewis

Brandie focuses her practice on product liability and mass tort defense, representing manufacturers, suppliers, and retailers regionally and nationally. She consults with clients on regulatory issues, CPSC investigations, and recalls; and provides counseling on preventative measures to help minimize litigation costs.

Newsroom image for the post NJL Adds Two to Labor & Employment Team

Posted December 31, 2020

NJL Adds Two to Labor & Employment Team

Minneapolis-based national firm Nilan Johnson Lewis (NJL) is pleased to announce the hires of Chelsea J. Bodin and Christopher T. Ruska, both joining our Labor and Employment team.

Newsroom image for the post Backlog to the Future: Lingering Questions about the Employment-Based Immigrant Visa Wait Times Under H.R. 1044/S. 386

Posted December 16, 2020 with Tags ,

Backlog to the Future: Lingering Questions about the Employment-Based Immigrant Visa Wait Times Under H.R. 1044/S. 386

As currently drafted, the bills would eliminate the 7% per-country ceiling for all employment-based visa categories by October 1, 2022. However, the bill would not eliminate the numerical cap for immigrant visas that could be issued per year. Instead, it would distribute the backlog across all countries by changing the visa allocation process to be a first-come, first-served process.

Newsroom image for the post DHS Extends Temporary Protected Status Benefits for El Salvador, Nicaragua, Sudan, Honduras, and Nepal Nationals

Posted December 10, 2020 with Tags ,

DHS Extends Temporary Protected Status Benefits for El Salvador, Nicaragua, Sudan, Honduras, and Nepal Nationals

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced on December 9, 2020, an extension of the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for El Salvador, Nicaragua, Sudan, Honduras, and Nepal through October 4, 2021. TPS is a temporary status that allows nationals of designated countries to remain and, in some cases, work in the United States until it is considered safe to return to their home country.

Newsroom image for the post Before In-Person Trials Halted, Three NJL Women Led (and Earned) Successful Defense Verdicts

Posted December 7, 2020

Before In-Person Trials Halted, Three NJL Women Led (and Earned) Successful Defense Verdicts

During the small window when trials briefly went live this fall, three Nilan Johnson Lewis women not only led the few pieces of pandemic litigation, but all three garnered full defense verdicts within three days of each other. This is significant when you consider nearly 97 percent of civil cases are resolved before going to trial in a typical year without a pandemic.

Newsroom image for the post Federal Judge Strikes Down Two Rules that Impose Restrictions on U.S. Employers who Sponsor Foreign Workers

Posted December 1, 2020 with Tags , ,

Federal Judge Strikes Down Two Rules that Impose Restrictions on U.S. Employers who Sponsor Foreign Workers

At issue was whether or not the Administration was justified in its determination that the COVID-19 pandemic provided a good cause exception to Section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act, which requires a proper public notice and comment period before a rule can be implemented. The court decided that it was not.

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